A Sense of Expectation and Agonizing Impatience: Some Thoughts on Dante’s Purgatory

Aeneas and the Shade of Creusa. Giuseppe Maria Mitelli. 1663. Engraving

Osip Mandelstam’s essay on the Divine Comedy, “Conversation about Dante” is a magnificent work of art in and of itself.  The Russian poet uses the most sublime language to describe the complexities of Dante’s poetic speech,  rhythm and structure; he compares various parts of the Divine Comedy to the intricate workings of a beehive, the elaborate geological structure of granite and marble, and the rich timbre of a cello:

Dante’s cantos are scores for a special chemical orchestra in which, for the external ear, the most easily discernible comparisons are those identical with the outbursts, and the solo roles, that is, the arias and ariosos, are varieties of self-confessions, self-flagellations, or autobiographies, sometimes brief and compact, sometimes lapidary, like a tombstone inscription: sometimes extended like a testimonial from a medieval university; sometimes powerfully developed, articulated and reaching a dramatic operatic maturity, for example, Francesca’s famous cantilena.

The density of the cello timbre is best suited to convey a sense of expectation and of agonizing impatience.  There exists no power on earth which could hasten the movement of honey flowing from a tilted glass jar.  Therefore the cello would come about and be given form only when the European analysis of time had made sufficient progress, when the thoughtless sundial had been transcended and the one-time observer of the shade stick moving across Roman numerals on the sand had been transformed into a passionate participant of a differential torture and into a martyr of the infinitesimal.  A cello delays sound, hurry how it may.  Ask Brahms—he knows it.  Ask Dante—he has heard it.

Mandelstam uses Inferno, Canto XXXIII and the description of the death of Ugolino and his sons by starvation at the hands of Archbishop Ruggieri of Pisa to prove his point about music and the cello.  But the scene in Purgatory, Canto II, of Dante’s attempted embrace of his beloved friend Cascella is, to me, equally “encased in a cello timbre, dense and heavy…”: (trans. Robin Kirkpatrick)

And one drew forward now, I saw to me
to take me in his arms with such great warmth
it moved me, so I did the same to him.
Ah shadows, empty save in how they look!
Three times I locked my hands behind his back
As many times I came back to my breast.
Wonder, I think was painted over me.
At which the shadow smiled, and so drew back,
while I, pursuing him, pressed further on.

Any good commentary will explain that these lines are an allusion to Aeneid 6 where Aeneas has traveled to the Underworld and sees and tries to embrace the spirit of his beloved father, Anchises: (All translations of Latin and Ancient Greek are my own)

Aeneas speaks to his father: “You, oh father, and the sad image of your spirit appearing to me so often are what drove me to seek out these thresholds. My ships wait on the Tyrrhenian sea. Allow me to grasp your hand, father, allow me father, and do not shrink away from my embrace. Speaking thus his face was soaked with large tears. Three times he tries to embrace his father’s neck with his arms; but three times the shade, grasped in vain, escapes his hands, similar to light winds or a winged dream.

As I was reading this Canto, however, what came to my mind, before the scene with Anchises, was a similar encounter earlier in the Aeneid between Aeneas and his lost wife Creusa in Book 2.  For me this double allusion increases the pathos of the futile attempts at embrace that occur in the Roman underworld and in Dante’s Purgatory.  As he is trying to escape Troy that is burning down around him, Aeneas loses his wife and tries to go back to the city to save her.  But he only finds Creusa’s spirit whose parting words to him are to continue loving their son and as a final gesture Aeneas tries to embrace her.  The lines in Latin are exactly the same as those in Aeneid 6:  “Three times he tries to embrace his wife’s neck with his arms; but three times the shade, grasped in vain, escaped his hands, similar to light winds or a winged dream.  The additional knowledge of the exchange between Aeneas and Creusa (it’s a shame that most commentaries don’t mention it)  makes a greater emotional impact when reading Dante’s reunion with Cascella and creates what Mandelstam describes as “a sense of expectation and agonizing impatience.”

The volucri somno—winged dream—is specifically Homeric and is Vergil’s allusion to Odysseus’s encounter with his mother in the underworld of the Odyssey.  Mandelstam’s concept of that delay of sound as applied to the Divine Comedy seems especially appropriate for these images of shades that reach back to Homer.  Homer and Ancient Greek were not available to Dante so it is only later generations of readers of Purgatory that truly hear the echoes from Book 11 of the Odyssey as Odysseus describes his attempts to embrace his mother, Anticleia:

After she spoke to me I was anxiously wishing to embrace the soul of my mother.  Three times my soul stirred me to embrace her, and I approached her, but three times she escaped from my hands like a shadow or a dream.  And the pain in my heart became even sharper to me.

The number three is often used in Ancient epics but I have always found it particularly fitting for this trope—three embraces are the perfect amount before a person becomes fully and painfully aware of loss and grief.  Any fewer than three would lessen the agony of each of these scenes and any more would make them melodramatic and overwrought.   The first is a naïve attempt to reach out and touch the person that was, in life, so important; the second attempt highlights a sense of denial and disbelief of the loss; the third and final attempt and failure to embrace brings about the painful reality of a physical absence.  This seems like a fitting metaphor for the grief one experiences with death or with any other loss we go through in life.  Cue the heavy, slow music of the cello…

12 Comments

Filed under Classics, Italian Literature, Literature in Translation

12 responses to “A Sense of Expectation and Agonizing Impatience: Some Thoughts on Dante’s Purgatory

  1. Lovely, especially to read this in Rome. I especially liked your evocation of the number three.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Vishy

    Beautiful, brilliant post, Melissa! I loved the passage by Osip Mandelstam on the cello, that you have quoted! So beautiful! I also loved what you said about the number three! It is so fascinating that there is a similar, almost identical scene (though with different characters) in The Odyssey, The Aeneid and The Divine Comedy! Your whole post and the quotes you shared were so insightful and thought-provoking. Thanks so much for sharing! Can I quote lines from your post?

    Liked by 1 person

  3. What you say about the number three seems so true and yet impossible to prove – it simple feels right!
    Do you think you lose something reading Dante in English which doesn’t rhyme?

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m sure that something is lost. I imagine it’s similar to prose translations of the Aeneid where the dactyllic hexameter is lost. I guess I will have to learn Italian and read it in the original!

      Like

  4. Ali

    Okay, so now I need to seek out the Mandelstam essay! I love reading secondary works on the Divine Comedy because it is a work of literature that has so much meaning. I actually own a lot of secondary literature on the work, and I have read quite a bit about it. Once I finish with the Aeneid (I decided to reread it since the last time I read it was 30 years ago in AP Latin), I think I’m going to reread the Divine Comedy. Your posts are inspiring me to revisit it. Thanks for sharing this.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Very beautiful. Reading this post I was taken into that dream realm, where Dante and the Ancients make the shades so real, and not just the shades but the whole dimension of imagination, that feels like a parallel universe where you cab see the ships on the Tyrrhenian sea; or Aeneas trying to get back to Troy; and each person’s arms encircling a shade only to clutch an empty form. You’ve evoked a strangely circular Underworld and the shades that inhabit it; with Dante, Vergil and Homer at different stations on a spiral of Time. Many thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Craig

    Thank you for your post. When I read the quote from Mandelstam, I was speechless. (Upon rereading it, I have managed a ‘Wow! That is brilliant’). The allusions you pick up on to Vergil and to Homer, and your interpretation of ‘three’ are all well done, and make for compelling reading. An excellent post.

    Liked by 1 person

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